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Professional Development/Training FAQs

You have many options when it comes to your professional development. Whether you have decided to take a college course for credit, attend one of the many workshops/trainings available in the community or complete an internet class or independent study course, it is important to know the facts. 

Building your professional portfolio is an investment of time and money. You need to be assured that what you've invested into your professional growth and development will be recognized by Child Care Licensing and your employer, and that it will lead you in the direction of accomplishing your personal goals. 

The most important rule of thumb to follow as you make decisions about your professional development is that, with the exception of college courses, all training must be approved by The Nevada Registry!  Browse through the list of frequently asked questions below regarding training and professional development and click on the question of interest to find the answer.


Can my training be counted as college credit? 

No. There currently is no formal way to articulate informal training hours into formal education. Therefore, the Registry will count education/training as college credit only when college courses have been taken/completed at an accredited institution of higher education (community college or university), appear on a college transcript, and when a grade of "C" or better has been awarded.


Can my ECE college courses be used to meet my annual training requirements? 

Yes! A one-credit ECE college course is equivalent to 15 hours of child care training*. In other words, you can take an ECE course at your local community college or university and meet your annual training requirements at the same time.

*Licensing will only accept college coursework when it is an ECE course (i.e., you can't meet your training requirements by taking a math class). Always check with your local Licensing surveyor when taking a course not clearly related to ECE to ensure that it will be accepted.


How do I get the college course I'm taking approved?

Whereas all training taken informally (not for college credit) must be approved by the Registry, credit-bearing college courses taken from accredited colleges and universities do not have to go through the Registry's training approval process. Instead, college courses related to Early Care and Education are typically considered "automatically approved". However, Child Care Licensing makes determinations about whether a course you are taking can be considered to meet your annual training requirements so always be sure to check with your surveyor if you are unsure about whether a course will be accepted.


What do I need to show my Licensing surveyor when I’ve taken a college course? 

Transcripts or grade reports serve as verification in your file. Official transcripts are not required. Please note that because most “Grade Reports” printed off the Internet do not show the name of the student who completed the course (only an ID number), Licensing will ask you to print out an unofficial transcript. 

What is the difference between child care training hours and a CEU?

Whereas a Continuing Education Unit (CEU) is a measure used in continuing education programs, particularly those required in a licensed profession in order for the professional to maintain the license, child care training hours are simply that; the number of hours that a particular training or workshop was held.

Examples of people who need CEUs include architects, engineers, educators, nurses, mental health professionals, and social workers. Generally, a CEU is defined as ten hours of participation in a recognized continuing education program, with qualified instruction and sponsorship. CEU records are widely used to provide evidence of completion of continuing education requirements mandated by certification bodies, professional societies, or governmental licensing boards. The records also provide employers with information on training pertinent to particular occupations. 

The Registry approves trainings for child care training hours only. The certificate for each Registry-approved training you attend should include the number of hours it was approved for as well as the unique approval code. 


What if I attended a training but didn’t get a certificate and/or the certificate I received doesn’t have an approval code from the Registry? 

If you do not have a certificate, or the certificate does not have a Nevada Registry approval code, the course will not be counted toward your annual training requirement. Always be certain to verify that a training has been approved PRIOR to taking it. The easiest way to do this is to visit our online training calendar. Anything that has been approved by the Registry, and that is open to the public, will appear on the calendar up until, and including, the day of the event. If ever you are in doubt, feel free to contact our office to speak with a Registry Associate who can verify the approval status for you. 


I received a flyer from an organization offering independent study trainings (correspondence courses, internet course, etc.). It says that all courses are approved for hours in most states. Can I assume these courses are approved by the Registry? 

No! Even if an agency has submitted their distance learning courses for approval by the Registry, there is no guarantee that ALL of their available trainings have been accepted/approved. As with ALL training, you should refer to the Registry's online training calendar to determine whether a course you are interested in taking has been approved. Don't assume that hours will be accepted by Licensing just because the course is listed on a flyer sent by the organization and/or their website. If a training doesn't appear on the training calendar, it's not approved and will not be accepted by Licensing! 


Can I receive training hours for implementing ideas obtained from curriculum books I've purchased?  

The Registry is occasionally asked whether hours can be obtained for implementing curriculum. The answer to this question is no; the Registry does not issue child care training hours for the implementation of curriculum. Implementing curriculum is viewed as a function of a job in Early Care and Education and outside the bounds of what is considered "training". In most cases, curriculum books and materials are discovered via the internet, the library, a store, a colleague or some other means. In most cases, the material is read through and activities are implemented. There typically is not any type of feedback offered from the author of the materials, any "assignments" or activities that assess whether the activities are being implemented correctly, and there generally isn't a standardized way to grant hours for reading/researching curriculum philosophies and ideas (a certificate isn't typically issued by anyone). Though the Registry has been made aware of several companies advertising that hours can be earned when purchasing their curriculum books, these companies and their products have not been approved by the Registry; these companies are selling a product, not offering training. This is not to be confused with training that is offered by a trainer in a traditional classroom setting. In this case, the Registry will approve training that is focused on curriculum ideas, etc.; the difference being that is it being offered in person with the intent to teach caregivers how to implement the ideas presented. The main goal is not to sell a product.


Can I receive training hours for a book and/or video that I've purchased or checked out from the library? 

The Registry does not grant training hours for reading a standalone book and/or for viewing a video ("stand alone" meaning a material that is not part of a training, not being offered by an organization as a correspondence course, etc. Most commonly, stand alone books and videos are found at local libraries). The approval of such materials was discontinued when the Registry took on the training approval system in October 2004. Since that time, hundreds of non-traditional (self-paced, independent study) options have been posted to the online calendar of training; all of which have gone through the approval process and are tied to the issuance of a certificate for completion of a set of predetermined requirements.


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